Nova Scotia sparkles

03.07.2013

Nova Scotia is where you will find the near perfect climatic conditions under the gulf-stream putting the sparkle into wines that could rival the Champagne region. Atlantic Ocean breezes bring a cool growing season to the local grapes which typically develop a serious intensity, despite the cooler climate.

You probably know about the sea-spans and the famous clam chowder of this Canadian retreat village. You probably know about the gorgeous holiday homes of Forest Lakes and if you’re a wine lover, you probably want to know about the grape vintages from this terroir.

Nova Scotia is where you will find the near perfect climatic conditions under the gulf-stream putting the sparkle into wines that could rival the Champagne region. Atlantic Ocean breezes bring a cool growing season to the local grapes which typically develop a serious intensity, despite the cooler climate.

For the local community it’s important to introduce their wine scene to discerning international guests who stay there.

Nova Scotia as a wine region mostly came on the map because of the bright, crisp and aromatic white wines with a forward moving acidity and character. It makes sense that the locally grown wines which are influenced by the same gusts and beams, match perfectly to the local world-famous lobster, scallops and salmon. We recommend white hybrids such as L’Acadie Blanc, Seyval Blanc, Vidal and New York Muscat, which have been received with many commendations in Nova Scotia and inspired more work on vinifera such as Chardonnay, Ortega and Riesling.

If you prefer red wine, you’ll be surprised to know that even though the climate is perfect for a short growing season, there are also some dark wines coming from this region.  As well rounded, full-bodied as the local chowder, you’ll find dry red wines with low tannins. Those who like an earthy-smoky note with berry fruit characteristics will want to go to the local butcher to find a gamey red meat and learn the traditional hearty Nova Scotia stew recipes to cook up something.
Varietals such as Lucie Kuhlmann, Baco Noir, Marechal Foch and Leon Millot are what you want to look out for.

Of course, icewines are a natural choice in this terroir.  The short growing season means that grapes cool over very quickly and well. If you’re lucky, you can go see the teams harvesting at night between late November and late December when the temperatures hit between -8 °C and -10 °C.

If exploring the wine regions of Nova Scotia is interesting for you, please contact our team at Engel & Völkers:
http://goo.gl/yYBHq

If you wish more information please contact us: socialmedia@engelvoelkers.com  

Posted in Resorts.


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