Which countries celebrate Thanksgiving?

It should come as no surprise that, when we ask which countries celebrate Thanksgiving, the answer is “too many to list”.

We’re getting into the spirit of the season by giving thanks for some of the most beautiful traditions around the world. Read on to find out how you can incorporate them into your own celebrations, whether in your holiday décor, food or atmosphere.

Hamburg - Americans aren’t the only ones giving thanks this autumn. Find out how it’s done abroad in our latest article.

Thanksgiving, USA

We start with the most obvious celebrant – but don’t expect to know all of their traditions. The original Thanksgiving in 1621 wasn’t so much about over-indulgence as fasting, prayer and thanking the native Wampanoag tribe for teaching the pilgrims how to survive the winter.

We can enjoy the spirit of this first Thanksgiving today by shunning over-consumption. Instead, create small dishes that celebrate the richness and diversity of the harvest. Delicious sides like sautéed green beans with spiced pecans or cardamom-glazed carrots provide the sense of indulgence of the occasion – without the need for big portions.

Erntedankfest, Germany

Thanksgiving history begins with the European harvest festivals that the American pilgrims took with them aboard the Mayflower. Today, these rural harvest festivals are still thriving in Germany, where the Erntedankfest (Harvest Thanks Festival) takes place on the first Sunday of October: and it’s all about enjoying the bounty of the harvest.

The Erntekrone (harvest crown) is central to the occasion. Usually made of newly harvested wheat, these are traditionally awarded to the harvest queen, but larger versions often feature as centrepieces during feasting. They look great alongside brightly coloured harvest wreaths, interwoven with seasonal flowers.

Kinrō Kansha no Hi, Japan

It’s not only Europeans and their American relations who have long-standing traditions of harvest celebration. In fact, Japan’s thanksgiving history is even more ancient. Kinrō Kansha no Hi (Labour Thanksgiving Day), celebrated on 23 November, can be traced as far back as 660 BCE. It began as time of ritual thanks for the harvest reflection on the year’s work, but the labour element gained extra prominence after World War II, when industrial workers’ rights were enshrined in a new constitution.

While it’s not as showy as its European counterparts, the Kinrō Kansha no Hi tradition of celebrating your achievements is well worth incorporating. Invite guests to bring photos they’re proud of, or send you electronic files you can project onto your walls. It will provide a focal point for the thanksgiving, and plenty of interesting anecdotes too.

If discovering which countries celebrate Thanksgiving has whet your cultural appetite, incorporate some of these international ideas into your holiday celebrations to step out of your hosting comfort zone and surprise and delight your guests.

Contact us now

Engel & Völkers Blog
Email
Back
Contact
Please enter your contact details here
Thank you for your request. We will contact you shortly.

Your Engel & Völkers Team
Salutation
  • Mr.
  • Mrs.

Here you can find out which data are stored in detail and who has access to them. 
I agree to the storage and use of my data in accordance with the data protection declaration and agree to the processing of my data within the Engel & Völkers Group to answer my contact or information request. I can revoke my consent at any time for the future.
I can revoke my consent at any time for the future.

Send now

Follow us on social media

Array
(
[EUNDV] => Array
(
[67d842e2b887a402186a2820b1713d693dd854a5_csrf_offer-form] => MTM5MjE5NzU3NkJ4d29xancwTDVhZWFIRzEycXAxcW9SdElHdVBqMTdV
[67d842e2b887a402186a2820b1713d693dd854a5_csrf_contact-form] => MTM5MjE5NzU3NnlHcUR0Y2VlTXVPUndLMHZkMW9zMnRmRlgxaUcwaFVG
)
)